Welcome

to the first web page

dedicated to the

International Frog Language

(You found it on the Internet. So, it must be true!)

 

 

The IFL consists of a single word: ribbit that means everything to all people (and frogs).

 

 

Origins:

International Frog began in a small pond and started spreading among people shortly after a wicked witch changed the handsome frog prince into an ugly human. Hes searching for a frog princess to kiss him and turn him back into a frog (a future movie plot).

 

 

Adoption:

The language has been taught to people of America (Virginia, Michigan, California, and others), the UK, Norway, and other countries. (Be the first in your area to speak International Frog.)

 

Its strange that the language is spreading slowly because it is so easy to learn as a child but more difficult for adults.

 

 

In practice:

To count to ten on your fingers, in International Frog, it is simply ribbit, ribbit, ribbit, ribbit, ribbit, ribbit, ribbit, ribbit, ribbit, ribbit.

 

 

Conversations can be easily done in International Frog:

 

Wells:  Ribbit!

Bill:     Ribbit! Ribbit ribbit ribbit?

Wells:   Ribbit ribbit.

Bill:    Ribbit.

 

As with any serious language, normal punctuation applies.

 

 

IFL Literature:

A classic poem (a limerick) in International Frog is:

 

Ribbit ribbit ribbit ribbit ribbit, Ribbit,

Ribbit ribbit ribbit ribbit ribbit ribbit,

Ribbit ribbit,

Ribbit ribbit,

Ribbit ribbit ribbit.

 

 

(Note: its not possible to do haiku in International Frog.)

 

 

Grammar Rules:

Rule 1. As with any serious language, normal punctuation applies.

Rule 2. Subject and verb numbers are allowed to argue or agree to disagree.

Rule 3. To conjugate verbs and articles, use the generic form, "ribbit".

Rule 4. Never "ribbit" when you can "ribbit."

Rule 5. Ribbit before ribbit except after ribbit, unless it sounds like ribbit as in "ribbit" or "ribbit."

Rule 6. Always use the polite form, ribbit.

Rule 7. Pluralization: plural nouns tend to end in "t"; singular nouns also end in "t".

Rule 8. IFL ALWAYS uses the Oxford comma as in: "ribbit, ribbit, ribbit ribbit".

Rule 9. IFL does NOT have the "let's eat[,] gramma" life or death issue.

Rule 10. When in doubt, trust your ear.

 

 

Controversy:

There have been radical underground groups who try to speak International Frog by saying needit. This is not an official dialect approved by the International Federation of the Promotion of Amphibian Languages (IFPAL). The speakers of needit are probably T.O.A.D.S (Those Other Alternate Dialect Speakers).

 

 

Your invitation:

You, too, can speak International Frog! Just try it with your friends. Its fun, has no know harmful side effects, and, as humor is good for you, its actually healthy!

 

 

Ribbit!